What Agreements Were Reached At The Yalta Conference

As an Allies` victory was likely, the objective of the Yalta conference was to decide what to do with Germany after it was defeated. In many ways, the Yalta conference set the stage for the rest of the Cold War in Europe. The first reaction to the Yalta Accords was solemn. Roosevelt and many other Americans saw this as proof that the spirit of US-Soviet war cooperation would be transmitted until the post-war period. But this feeling was only short-lived. With the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt on April 12, 1945, Harry S. Truman became the 33rd President of the United States. At the end of April, the new government clashed with the Soviets over its influence in Eastern Europe and the United Nations. Concerned about the lack of cooperation felt by the Soviets, many Americans began to criticize the way Roosevelt negotiated the Yalta negotiations. To this day, many of Roosevelt`s critics accuse him of “ceding” Eastern Europe and Northeast Asia to the Soviet Union at Yalta, although the Soviets made many substantial concessions.

A Soviet condition for a declaration of war in Japan was an official recognition of China`s Mongolian independence (the Mongolian People`s Republic was a Soviet satellite state from the beginning of 1924 until World War II). The Soviets also wanted recognition of Soviet interests in Manchuria and Port Arthur (but not the Chinese for rent). These conditions were agreed without China`s participation. The French head of state, General Charles de Gaulle, was not invited to the Yalta conference or to the Potsdam conference, a small diplomat who aroused deep and persistent resentment. [5] De Gaulle attributed his exclusion from Yalta to Roosevelt`s long-standing personal antagonism against him, although the Soviet Union also refused his admission as a full participant. But the absence of a French representation in Yalta also meant that De Gaulle`s invitation to the Potsdam conference would have been very problematic. It would then have felt honourable to insist on the need to reopen all the issues agreed upon in Yalta in his absence. [6] At that time, the Soviet army had occupied Poland entirely and held much of Eastern Europe with a military power three times greater than allied forces in the West. [Citation required] The declaration of the liberated Europe has little to do to dispel the sphere of influence of the agreements that had been incorporated into ceasefire agreements. Each of the three heads of state and government had their own agenda for post-war Germany and liberated Europe.

Roosevelt wanted Soviet support in the American Pacific War against Japan, particularly for the planned invasion of Japan (Operation August Storm) and Soviet participation in the United Nations; Churchill insisted on free elections and democratic governments in Central and Eastern Europe (particularly Poland); Stalin called for a Soviet sphere of political influence in Central and Eastern Europe as an essential aspect of the USSR`s national security strategy. Stalin`s position at the conference was one he believed to be so strong that he could dictate conditions. According to the member of the American delegation and future Secretary of State, James F. Byrnes, “it was not a question of what we would leave to the Russians, but what we could do to the Russians” [9] “There is no doubt that the flow of Anglo-Soviet-American friendship had reached a new height,” wrote James Byrnes, who accompanied Roosevelt to Yalta, in his memoirs.